Spectrum: Interactive Media & Online Developer News 18 February 2002

Reported, written and edited by David Duberman
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Today's Headlines (details below)

WEBMEISTER
--Macromedia Announces Support for .Net Framework

DEVELOPER'S TOOLBOX
--Norpath Debuts Interactive Authoring Software --Metrowerks Ships PS2 CodeWarrior in Korea

GRAPHICALLY SPEAKING
--Softimage Expands Product Family
--ART Updates Maya Add-on
--Caligari Updates trueSpace

CONSUMER CHANNEL
--VTech Offers New Voyager Adventure System

THE DIALS & LEVERS OF POWER
--O'Reilly Publishes Blog Book

GAMES PEOPLE PLAY
--Spectrum Exclusive: Warcraft III Beta Report --LucasArts News
--Sierra News
--Activision News

NUMBEROLOGY
--Game Publishers Lose Billions to Piracy

DIGERATI ILLUMINATI
--Nominees Named for Game Developers Choice Awards

HAPPENINGS
--O'Reilly Emerging Tech Conference Set for Santa Clara

F.Y.I.
--About Spectrum
___________________________________

WEBMEISTER

Macromedia Announces Support for .Net Framework Macromedia last week announced support for the Microsoft .Net platform and its programming model, the .Net Framework, which simplifies the creation of XML web services. Macromedia is working with Microsoft Corp. to ensure interoperability between the .Net Framework and Macromedia's tools, servers, and players. Macromedia also said that a future generation of Macromedia Dreamweaver UltraDev will let Dreamweaver developers to build ASP.Net applications using a visual-development environment. A future generation of Macromedia Dreamweaver UltraDev will be complementary to Visual Studio .Net, as the products use two different models to let users build dynamic web applications. The future generation of Dreamweaver UltraDev will enable developers leverage familiar web-development techniques to visually assemble complex .Net Framework web applications with drag-and-drop authoring. Macromedia is also working to ensure future versions of Macromedia Flash Player and ColdFusion support the .Net Framework. Macromedia Flash Player already has XML support and web services integration said to simplify the authoring of client applications. The next major release of Macromedia ColdFusion, code-named "Neo," will also interoperate with Microsoft .Net platform technologies through support for XML web services and Microsoft .Net servers. http://www.macromedia.com/ ___________________________________

DEVELOPER'S TOOLBOX

Norpath Debuts Interactive Authoring Software Canada-based Norpath Inc., last week released the beta version of its Elements Design Studio Pro, authoring software for creating interactive solutions such as learning applications, Web, rich-media presentations, kiosks, and simulations. Supported platforms are Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and Solaris. The final product is expected to ship mid 2002 with a suggested retail price of USD$499. Elements Design Studio uses an object-based design environment, including a suite of drawing, animation, multimedia, knowledge, interaction, and application-logic tools. It also ships with element libraries, templates, and publishing wizards. Content created with Design Studio can be run with Norpath's free player, a one-time install that works as a standalone or Web browser plug-in. Player features include a kiosk mode designed for use in public environments such as classrooms, tradeshows, technology & science displays, as well as information stations. The Java-based player is available for multiple platforms. http://www.norpath.com/products.html ___________________________________ Metrowerks Ships PS2 CodeWarrior in Korea Now they just have to figure out how to solve the piracy problem (see Numberology story, below). Metrowerks and Hankook MDS Co., Ltd last week began shipping CodeWarrior for PlayStation2, Version 3.0 in Korea. The availability of Metrowerks' latest tool set for PlayStation2 follows the official launch of PlayStation2 in Korea last week by Sony Computer Entertainment Korea Inc. (SCEK). CodeWarrior Analysis Tools for PlayStation2, Version 1.1, a set of tools for analyzing and optimizing PlayStation games, will be available at the same time. CodeWarrior for PlayStation2, Version 3.0 provides debugging support for the Input-Output Processor (IOP) and the Vector Processing Units (VU), as well as compiler support for the IOP. With CodeWarrior, PlayStation2 developers can debug the VU microcode, the IOP's memory and the Emotion Engine's (EE) processor within one debugging interface. Version 3.0 includes additional support for viewing and debugging the DMA channel, VU static code analysis, and frame by frame profiling--all designed to enhance and speed up the debugging process. The tool set is hosted on Windows98/2000 and Windows NT operating systems, and includes supports for Assembler, C and C++ programming languages. The product provides the capability to edit, compile, link, and debug at the source level. ¦Contact the below address for information and products in Korea: HANKOOK MDS Co., Ltd., TEL:+82-2-2645-0386 FAX?+82-2-2649-8290 E-mail: kr-ps2-info@metrowerks.com ___________________________________

GRAPHICALLY SPEAKING

Softimage Expands Product Family Newly available from Avid Technology subsidiary Softimage are new models for its flagship Softimage|XSI v.2.0 nonlinear animation [NLA] system. The expanded product line introduces new Workstation and Enterprise variants, with the new models replacing all earlier versions. Models now include: * Essentials Workstation v.2.0 * Essentials Enterprise v.2.0 * Advanced Workstation v.2.0 * Advanced Enterprise v.2.0 The company also announced several limited-time programs, as well a lower per-license price for the mental ray rendering solution. The Essentials line delivers a nonlinear animation production environment with modeling and animation tools, coupled with rigging tools and an interactive rendering solution. The Advanced line adds an integrated 2D/3D compositing environment, particles and soft bodies, and integrated hair/fur dynamics simulation. The new Workstation option is targeted individuals and smaller operations whose work does not require high levels of network flexibility and rendering options. The package is node locked to a specific dongle (Windows or Linux) or system ID (Irix) and a specific operating system. The Enterprise variant, for larger organizations, provides the ability to float licenses across system and multiple operating systems [for IRIX, Windows NT, Windows 2000 or LINUX] and between departments or facilities. It enables distributed rendering anywhere on the network, from any source, and includes new workgroup capabilities for easier project management. http://www.softimage.com/configurator ___________________________________ ART Updates Maya Add-on Advanced Rendering Technology (ART) last week began shipping an upgrade to RenderPipe for Maya, the plug-in interface to the company's PURE and RenderDrive 3D rendering products for users of Alias|Wavefront's Maya application. The update reportedly delivers an expanded and improved set of shaders, providing more complete coverage for Maya's standard Shading Nodes and ensuring a match on these shader nodes between ART's rendering devices and the default Maya renderer. The Shader Pack upgrade for the RenderPipe for Maya interface includes new support of Maya shading nodes, and an improved visual match for some nodes already supported. New shading nodes within the Shader Pack upgrade includes: Cloud, Crater, Granite, Marble, Mountain, Rock, SolidFractal, Snow, Water, and Wood. Shaders that have been rewritten to give a more accurate visual match with Maya includes: Brownian, Bulge, Checker, Cloth, Fractal, GammaCorrect, Grid, LayeredTexture, Leather, Multiply Divide, Place2Dtexture, Ramp, Set Range, and Stucco. The Shader Pack upgrade will be provided free to registered PURE and RenderDrive customers who use Maya. PURE ($3,699) comprises software and PCI card hardware based on the company's proprietary ray traced rendering 3D graphics chips, which automatically perform the geometry and shading operations of the ray tracing algorithm. PURE's toolset includes real-world lighting, physically-based materials, motion blur, and depth of field. Application plug-in interfaces to PURE are available for 3dsmax, 3D Studio VIZ, Maya, and the generic RenderMan language. http://www.art-render.com ___________________________________ Caligari Updates trueSpace New from Caligari Corporation is trueSpace 5.2 with a new Facial Animator tool that generates animated human facial muscle movements directly from speech or text input using high-level animation controls. The new version of Caligari's 3D modeling program also features Key Frame Editor animation enhancements. Facial Animator can use a generic model of a human head or a model provided by the user. The model can then be matched to a real human face with a new texture editor that uses two photographs of an actual human face and converts them into a textured 3D model. The new Lip-Sync capability lets users automatically create facial animation directly from speech by generating speech-related human facial muscle movements for the entire human face. Users can also combine speech animation with key-framed animations for high-level control of character emotions. Smiles, frowns, and expressions of anger, relief, and other emotions can be created by adjusting slider values. The enhanced Key Frame Editor makes vertex- and bone-animation parameters available for editing in track and function curve views, and animation tracks can be assigned to individual vertices or bones. All function curves for a single animation parameter are displayed simultaneously on one screen for easy editing. http://www.caligari.com ___________________________________

CONSUMER CHANNEL

VTech Offers New Voyager Adventure System Voyager is a new interactive learning platform from VTech where kids immerse themselves in adventures and determine where to go next. The Voyager Adventure System uses a touch screen to bring adventures to life for kids ages 4 to 7. The technology is designed to let them discover and learn at their own pace through colorful, interactive landscapes and fun activities that teach reading skills, math skills, and more. As the adventures develop, Voyager's software responds and adapts based on kids' choices, providing a personalized experience. Interchangeable software Adventure Packs are sold separately. The Voyager Adventure Station features a scrolling color touch-screen, LCD screen, attached magic stylus pen and QWERTY keyboard. Kids can use their magic pen to touch the colorful screen, type on the keyboard and see questions and words on the LCD screen. As kids make progress within each adventure, educational activities and lessons are woven into the setting, covering subjects such as reading, spelling, math, science and history. Voyager's Dynamic Memory is the "brains" behind this platform and enables such interactivity features as random response technology, whereby kids can get a different response from the game even if they touch the same object twice. Voyager can adjust an adventure's storyline depending on the path a child selects, presenting a new challenge that reflects their location. For building comprehension, Voyager asks children questions about what they've seen as they explored. It also tracks their progress in achieving their goal or mission, and remembers the child's name to offer personalized encouragement. http://www.vtechkids.com/ ___________________________________

THE DIALS & LEVERS OF POWER

O'Reilly Publishes Blog Book Visionaries have the ability to draw pieces together to reveal a broader vista than we might otherwise be able to see, but they are usually not the force for change that creates the vision. Invention itself is the work of one or more individuals who pause to look at the pieces of a puzzle and ask, "Hey, what if ... ?" Slash, the open-source software that drives the popular Slashdot.org site, evolved as the Slashdot creators asked this question while their site took shape: "What if you could build a program to manage a Web site, where people could organize and create things through a browser instead of HTML editors and FTP clients? What if you let readers publish their thoughts, and comment on stories and on the comments of other users?" Slashdot has subsequently triggered a revolution of its own, drawing hundreds of thousands of users and dozens of imitators. In O'Reilly's just-released book, "Running Weblogs with Slash" (US $34.95) coauthors chromatic, Brian Aker, and Dave Krieger show readers how to make this popular, powerful, and free system work for their own sites. Slash, which stands for the "Slashdot-Like Automated Storytelling Homepage" is more than just a Weblog. It separates presentation from content, has a database abstraction layer, performs powerful caching, hooks directly into the Apache Web server, and, according to the authors, can be extended to do just about anything a Web application can do. And, in the true spirit of open source software, it can be downloaded for free and modified as desired. "Running Weblogs with Slash" covers Slash from theory to customization. Targeted at site administrators and content managers, it is designed for people who want to run a medium-to-large Weblog but have neither the time nor the inclination to wade through the voluminous source code. The book teaches how to install and configure the software and covers common setups. Readers will learn how to publish Stories, create community guidelines, and even modify the underlying code. Written by users and developers, this book is also officially blessed by the people behind Slash and Slashdot. An article by coauthor chromatic, "Slash's Wiki Plugin" can be found at: http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2002/01/17/slash_plugin.html Chapter 4, "Editing and Updating Stories" is available free online at: http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/runblogslash/chapter/ch04.html For more information about the book, including Table of Contents, index, author bios, and samples, see http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/runblogslash/ ___________________________________

GAMES PEOPLE PLAY

Spectrum Exclusive: Warcraft III Beta Report Warcraft III is currently undergoing an online-only beta test, and I've been lucky enough to participate. The scope of play in the test has been limited (basically one-on-one and two-on-two), but it's easy to tell that WC3 is shaping up to be one of the best RTS games ever. The long-awaited sequel features four races: the familiar humans and orcs, as well as the new undead and night elves. Unlike some multi-race RTS games, there are clear distinctions among the races. For instance, the night elf workers don't need to mine gold--that's taken care of by the command center, which "entangles" the mine--but they disappear after building a structure. The game has added a number of significant features without losing sight of the all-important KISS principle, such as limiting resources to two types: gold and wood. The biggest difference between WC3 and its predecessors is in the use of heroes, which act as in-game squad leaders. The game doles out these super-fighters like a dope pusher; the first comes almost free, but subsequent heroes cost substantial amounts of resources. You don't need to include a hero with your squad, but you'd be foolish not to. First, heroes are the only ones that can pick up the booty left by vanquished NPCs (non-player characters), which guard various points on the game map. Said booty, which is tradeable, can include various types of enhancements and power-ups, such as a Tome of Experience to help the hero level up. Similarly, only heroes can deal with NPC facilities such as goblin workshops, where you can hire different types of powerful mercenaries. Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, your hero can invoke magic spells that might turn the tide of battle in your favor, assuming you have the presence of mind to use them (they're not automatic). Heroes can die, but if you've created the appropriate building, you can resuscitate them. Blizzard's Battle.net online service has been working almost flawlessly throughout the test. Connections and matchmaking are fast and easy. I'm not big on online gameplay, but WC3 has been a blast so far. If you've enjoyed Blizzard's games in the past, I can say with confidence that you'll get a big kick out of Warcraft III. ___________________________________ LucasArts News Coming this spring from LucasArts Entertainment is Star Wars Galactic Battlegrounds: Clone Campaigns, a collection of new scenarios enhancements for the company's 2001 RTS (real-time strategy) game. Expected to release in May on the PC, Clone Campaigns is inspired by the large-scale battles in Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones, as well as the classic and expanded Star Wars universe. The add-on features 14 original single-player combat scenarios, new civilizations, environments, vehicles, and more than 200 new units. By adding the expansion pack to Star Wars Galactic Battlegrounds, in both skirmish and multiplayer modes, players can mix and match civilizations from Attack of the Clones with those from the classic Star Wars universe. Clone Campaigns, as is its predecessor, is built upon enhanced engine technology from Ensemble Studios' Age of Kings. The expansion pack will feature technical improvements including upgraded shields, power cores, and new effects. Also, just out for PS2 is LucasArts' Star Wars Racer Revenge, developed in conjunction with Rainbow Studios, creators of Motocross Madness and ATV Offroad Fury. The new title lets players take control of fast Podracers in a series of perilous races throughout the Star Wars galaxy. Players assume the roles of Anakin, Sebulba, or one of more than 16 other Podracers. Sebulba is bent on avenging Anakin's upset victory in the Boonta Eve Classic. But it won't be any easier this time as Anakin has grown into a wiser and more skilled Podracer pilot. This sets the stage for Star Wars Racer Revenge, bringing newer, faster and even more dangerous Podracers back to this galaxy. The game features enhanced racing AI that offers on-course clashes with aggressive opponents who would rather crash than lose. To attain victory in this outlaw sport, pilots must master blazingly fast 600 mile-per-hour Podracers while engaging in no-holds-barred, jarring combat-style racing. The offers 13 race circuits across Tatooine and 4 new worlds. Each course features a variety of routes and shortcuts that Podracers will learn to navigate at break-neck speeds in order to win. In the game there are more than 16 Podracers from which players may choose, and each can be upgraded at Watto's shop. Players can compete in several types of game play including free-play, tournament, time trials, and vs. mode. http://www.lucasarts.com/ ___________________________________ Sierra News Sierra Entertainment and Valve, LLC plan a Q2 2002 release for Counter-Strike: Condition Zero, a new product that introduces single-player and co-op gameplay modes to the popular action title Half-Life. The new stand-alone product extends the Counter-Strike multiplayer game with new maps, weapons and more, while simultaneously introducing new technologies, an extensive single-player campaign, and cooperative play. Texas-based Gearbox Software is co-developing CS:CZ with Valve - the same partnership that produced Half-Life: Opposing Force and Half-Life: Blue Shift SKUs. Gearbox's single-player campaign includes over two dozen new missions and takes place in several fictitious regions of conflict around the globe. Players will also be able to set up cooperative games via Internet and LAN connections. http://www.gearboxsoftware.com Also, coming this fall from Sierra and Impressions Games is Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom. The game brings city builders inside the Great Wall of China. Leaving the Mediterranean behind, the city-building series makes its first foray into Asia and immerses the player in new surroundings. Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom will let gamers play a city building game with their friends, online via the Internet. A variety of both collaborative and competitive multiplayer games will be offered. Players might need to collaborate in building one of China's engineering marvels, or they might share a common goal to attain a certain level of affluence. In competitive multiplay, players take sides - or may be a side unto themselves - and fight for sole power over China. http://www.impressionsgames.com http://www.breakawaygames.com/ http://www.sierra.com ___________________________________ Activision News Gamers can rip up the streets and rub out the mob in Activision, Inc.'s Wreckless: The Yakuza Missions, a mission-based driving game for Xbox. The game immerses players in the unpredictable underworld of Hong Kong by allowing players to choose from two distinct storylines - either as part of an elite task force assigned to take down the Hong Kong mafia or as a high-level government agent trying to uncover links between the mafia and the police. In 20 missions, players pursue Yakuza thugs in 14 different vehicles through an interactive city and maneuver traffic patterns, tear through parks and drive on sidewalks to complete their mission. Star Trek: Bridge Commander, a space-combat sim from Activision and Totally Games, is in manufacturing. The game puts the player in command of a Galaxy-class starship tasked with identifying the cause of a mysterious solar eruption that destroyed a Federation colony. During the journey, players battle the Romulans, align with the Klingons, investigate the treacherous Cardassians, and reveal a secret plot that threatens the balance of power in the Alpha Quadrant. http://www.bridgecommander.com http://www.activision.com Lastly, subsidiary Activision Value has shipped Sega Hundred Swords for the PC to retail. The real-time strategy game challenges players to join forces with one of four warring factions as they battle through a mythical 3D adventure. Players assume the role of Larf Nalavale, a young king forced to defend his realm from invading forces on the day of his coronation. Players choose to play through one of four warring factions - Nalavale, Gran, Mascar or Riplustorie - each its their own storyline and battle characteristics. Players focus on strategy as they attempt to create an army of archers, mages, cavalry and infantry with the optimum skill-set to conquer the enemy. Players battle their way through 18 single-player missions as either the king or the queen, with seven complete chapters and 30 maps and mini-missions to complete. In addition, up to four players can compete in network battles that can engage up to 400 units at a time. A practice mode is also available. http://www.activisionvalue.com ___________________________________

NUMBEROLOGY

Game Publishers Lose Billions to Piracy The Interactive Digital Software Association (IDSA), the trade association representing U.S. computer and video game publishers, said last week that American game publishers continue to lose billions of dollars a year due to piracy of their products. The IDSA and other associations that make up the International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA) recommended that the U.S. government single out more than 50 countries for their failure to adequately protect intellectual property rights in accord with international obligations. "The worldwide growth of the U.S. game software industry is especially remarkable when you consider that it has largely occurred in only four markets: North America, Western Europe, Australia/New Zealand, and Japan. But there are at least 100 other countries around the globe where there is virtually no legitimate market for our products due to rampant piracy," said IDSA president Doug Lowenstein. "It is no exaggeration to say that the growth of the U.S. video game business is limitless if we can reduce piracy in these untapped markets to incidental levels." The IDSA reported that estimates of losses to piracy in 14 of the most problematic countries, including Mexico, reveal over $1.9 billion lost to the industry due to the prevalence of pirate product in those markets. For example, losses in Korea and China - where there is a growing popularity of PC and console games and a rapidly expanding hardware base - combine to total about half of the $1.9 billion. The IDSA claimed that total global losses for the entertainment software industry are significantly higher than $1.9 billion, as the current study does not reflect the following: losses incurred in the U.S., Canada and Western Europe; those resulting from direct download via the internet; or losses in markets where there is not reliable data (e.g. many portions of Eastern Europe). The IDSA's piracy loss estimates are included in the Special 301 report of the Washington-based International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA), filed with the United States Trade Representative last week. Under the "Special 301" trade law, the U.S. Trade Representative can impose trade sanctions following an investigation and consultation period. On December 20th of last year, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Zoellick announced the imposition of prohibitive duties on approximately $75 million worth of metals, footwear, and other imports from Ukraine resulting from its failure to curtail optical media piracy. The increased duties went into effect on January 23, 2002. The IIPA's report, which will be available at http://www.iipa.com, details in separate chapters the IP legal and enforcement-related deficiencies of more than 50 countries. The IIPA represents America's leading content associations on piracy issues worldwide, including the IDSA, AFMA (formerly the American Film Marketing Association), the Association of American Publishers (AAP), the Business Software Alliance (BSA), the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). Overall loss estimates for these industries in the problem countries surveyed exceed $9 billion for 2001. ___________________________________

DIGERATI ILLUMINATI

Nominees Named for Game Developers Choice Awards The International Game Developers Association (IGDA) has announced the nominees for the annual Game Developers Choice Awards. The winners will be announced at the ceremony on March 21, during the Game Developers Conference (GDC), March 19 - 23 in San Jose, Calif. Nominations were free and open to all professional game developers, regardless of membership or affiliation. The nominees are: * Game of the Year - Black & White (Lionhead Studios), Grand theft Auto III (DMA Design/Rockstar Games), Halo: Combat Evolved (Bungie Studios), Ico (Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc.), Max Payne (Remedy Entertainment) * Rookie Studio of the Year - Adrenium Games for Azurik: Rise of Perathia Bohemia, Interactive Studio for Operation Flashpoint, Croteam for Serious Sam, Pseudo Interactive for Cel Damage, TimeGate Studios for Kohan: Immortal Sovereigns * Original Game Character of the Year - Dante from Devil May Cry, Daxter from Jak & Daxter: The Precursor Legacy, Ico from Ico, Max Payne from Max Payne, Munch from Oddworld: Munch's Oddysee * Excellence in Audio - Erik Kraber & Jack Grillo for sound design in Clive Barker's Undying, Harry Gregson-Williams for composition in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty, Josh Randall for sound design in Frequency, Marty O'Donnell & team for sound effects in Halo: Combat Evolved, Thomas Engel for sound engineering in Star Wars Rogue Squadron II: Rogue Leader * Excellence in Game Design - Fumito Ueda & team for game design in Ico, GTA3 team for game play in Grand Theft Auto III, Lorne Lanning & Chris Ulm for story/writing of Oddworld: Munch's Oddysee, Peter Molyneux & team for game design in Black & White, Shigeru Miyamto & team for game design in Pikmin * Excellence in Level Design - Craig Filshie, William Mills, Chris Rothwell & James Worrall for level design in Grand Theft Auto III, Fumito Ueda & team for level design in Ico, Ghost Recon team for level design in Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon, Scott Campbell, Dave Jaffe, Kellan Hatch & team for level design in Twisted Metal: Black, Toshihiro Nagoshi & team for level design in Super Monkey Ball * Excellence in Programming - Kazunori Yamauchi & team for physics in Gran Turismo 3 A-spec, Andy Gavin for programming in Jak & Daxter: The Precursor Legacy, Jason Jones & team for programming in Halo: Combat Evolved, Richard Evans for artificial intelligence in Black & White, Sherman Archibald, John Carmack & Ryan Feltrin for graphics in Return to Castle Wolfenstein * Excellence in Visual Arts - Dan Arey & Evan Wells for animation in Jak & Daxter: The Precursor Legacy, Fumito Ueda & team for art direction in Ico, Kazunori Yamauchi & team for modeling in Gran Turismo 3, A-spec Lorne Lanning & Farzad Varahramyan for art direction in Oddworld: Munch's Oddysee, Tetsuya Mizuguchi & team for art direction in Rez * Game Innovation Spotlights - Black & White (Lionhead Studios), Cel Damage (Pseudo Interactive), Frequency (Harmonix Music Systems), Grand Theft Auto III (DMA Design), Ico (Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc.), Kohan: Immortal Sovereigns (TimeGate Studios), Majestic (Electronic Arts), Max Payne (Remedy Entertainment) * Rez (United Game Artists), Super Monkey Ball (Amusement Vision) An advisory committee from the IGDA will select the recipients of the Lifetime Achievement Award, First Penguin Award and the IGDA Award for Community Contribution. http://www.igda.org ___________________________________

HAPPENINGS

O'Reilly Emerging Tech Conference Set for Santa Clara O'Reilly & Associates' Emerging Technology Conference is coming to Northern California's Westin Santa Clara & Santa Clara Convention Center on May 13-16. The conference delves beyond the P2P label to draft a blueprint of a distributed Internet operating system--a new foundation that integrates next-generation applications that are device- and location-independent, and provides increasingly transparent services that transcend the features and capabilities of today's Web sites. Examining projects, approaches, and technologies at this conference will be entrepreneurs, technologists, programmers, business developers, policy-makers, and Internet strategists, all targeting three aspects: distributed, untethered, and adaptive systems. Confirmed Internet OS "architects" speaking at the Conference include Adam Bosworth, Don Box, Steven Johnson, Lawerence Lessig, Nelson Minar, Robert Morris, Richard F. Rashid, Clay Shirky, and Kelly Truelove. Conference participants will spotlight the projects, people, and cost-conscious business models that are likely to become important to the future of Internet computing. The conference will follow four tracks: distributed, untethered, and adaptive systems, and business models. For more details and to register, visit: http://conferences.oreilly.com/etcon/. Early-bird registration ends March 22, 2002. ___________________________________

F.Y.I.

About Spectrum Spectrum is an independent news service published every Monday for the interactive media professional community by Motion Blur Media. Spectrum covers the tools and technologies used to create interactive multimedia applications and infrastructure for business, education, and entertainment; and the interactive media industry scene. We love to receive interactive media and online development tools and CD-ROMs for review. Send your interactive multimedia business, product, people, event, or technology news to: duberman@dnai.com. We prefer to receive news by email but if you must, telephone breaking news to 510-549-2894. Send review product and press kits by mail to David Duberman, 2233 Jefferson Ave., Berkeley, CA 94703. If you contact companies or organizations mentioned here, please tell them you saw the news in Spectrum. Thanks. ___________________________________ Please send address changes (with old and new addresses), subscribe and unsubscribe requests etc. to the above address. If you use the Reply function, please do _not_ echo an entire issue of Spectrum with your message. ___________________________________ Publisher's note: We are now accepting limited advertising. If you'd like to offer your company's products or services to Spectrum's elite audience of Internet and multimedia professionals, send an email query to duberman@dnai.com, or telephone 510-549-2894 during West Coast business hours. - David Duberman ___________________________________ (c)Copyright 2002 Motion Blur Media. All rights reserved. No reproduction in any for-profit or revenue-generating venue in any form without written permission from the publisher.